Negative space is the area found around, within, and between objects. They can transform a subject into a relevant shape all its own. (Photo by Kathi Ferguson)

I can attest to that, since I consider myself one of them.
Something that may look rather ordinary to most could be perceived as a thing of beauty by the artist — just waiting to be painted or photographed.
Artists are not simply attracted to a scenic landscape, a pretty face, or the color of the sky.
They observe more of what surrounds them and look beyond the surface.
Mother Nature reveals countless examples of this, if you know what to look for.
Her wonders are composed of a myriad of shapes, colors, texture and striking contrasts, no matter what the season.
And somehow, they all come together flawlessly.
Here on the Eastern Shore, we are embraced by open skies, fields, charming old towns, waterfront and inland farm landscapes, just to name a few.
Many of us pass by them every day, while others may discover them on a leisurely Sunday drive.
Depending on the season or the time of day, each scene presents itself in a different light, so to speak.
Darks play against lights where a line of deep green pine touches a clear autumn sky.
Highlights from a setting sun catch the tips of switchgrass and tree tops.
The blue of the Bay appears muted under an overcast sky, in contrast to displaying a rich, blue gray color on a crisp winter day.
Not to be overlooked are the textures that can be seen across fields of growing corn, the peeling bark of a River Birch, ground covers of golden buttercups, or vast, open spaces reaching for the horizon.
Interestingly, my eye will catch something within a scene that stands on its own, deserving of special attention.
The patterns and rhythm of movement in a cluster of grasses matted down by wind.
For example, or looking down a row of perfectly aligned loblollies seeming to stand at attention, cast distinctive shadows across the ground.
The nooks and crannies of winter’s bare trees are randomly sprinkled with the white of freshly fallen snow, before the warmth of the sun slowly melts it away.
Every so often, I admire the abstract patterns of a scene formed by what artists refer to as negative space.
Negative space is the area found around, within, and between objects.
They can transform a subject into a relevant shape all its own. Spotting them just takes a new way of seeing.
So, next time you venture out and about, know that if you look beyond the surface, the ordinary can become extraordinary, and you will grow your perception of the world around you.
Beauty is, after all, in the eye of the beholder.