Category: Features

Learn to think outside the branch

By Charlene Marcum For many, the fondest Christmas memories are made going to the tree farm with my family and selecting our Christmas tree. The smell of freshly cut fir, spruce and pine evergreens and the selection process for “the perfect tree” heralds in the Christmas season like no other. While many families still hold to this tradition, the times they are a’changing. The first artificial Christmas trees, made with goose feathers dyed green, were developed in Germany during the 19th century. Over the years, other styles of artificial Christmas trees evolved and become popular. In 1930, the Addis...

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Use a smart strategy when making your resolutions list

by Emily Brockbrader “Lose weight.” … “Eat healthier.” … “Become more organized.” … “This is the year of ME.” Sound familiar? As the holiday season looms, many of us take the time to look back on 2017 and re-evaluate some life choices. All the things you had planned when the ball dropped may have fallen by the wayside this past spring. According to webmd.com, 68 percent of people had lost sight of their New Year’s goal by March — just three months in — and at year-end only 15 percent remained committed. “People are doing it all wrong,” says Robert Butterworth, PhD, a clinical psychologist in Los Angeles. “The worst time to make New Year’s resolutions is on New Year’s Eve. We’re exhausted after the holidays. We’re stressed out. The weather is bad. Everyone is talking about it and watching what your resolutions are.” Even so, more than half of Americans make New Year’s resolutions, and marketing for health clubs, diet programs and smoking cessation medications skyrocket. Even with all the flashy “get bathing suit ready!” ads, in the end, the results will depend on you, your desire and the right strategy. Start small, in weekly, or even daily, increments. Everyone has a different goal and looking at it as a whole can be a bit daunting. Let’s say you’d like to lose 50 pounds. Instead of “I want...

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A new haven for honeybees

By Carol Kinsley In 2009, Chris and Carrie Jennings purchased five acres of former cornfield in Cordova, Md., just 10 minutes from Easton. Chris, a cabinet maker, built a beautiful home there. “There were three trees on the property,” noted Carrie, who has a degree from Virginia Tech in environmental policy and planning with an emphasis in forestry. While working full-time for Queen Anne’s County Soil Conservation District as agricultural resource conservation specialist, she set out, with Chris’ help, to create a dream landscape which includes fields of flowers and flowering trees where honeybees would have plenty of nectar. Together...

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Learn to allergy-proof holiday desserts, deliciously

By Debra R. Messick Feeding those we love with sweet holiday treats often involves equal measures of stress and bliss. Bustling to shop for ingredients, mixing, then baking sometimes drains our last ounce of energy when we’re most pressed for time. But the heavenly aromas and over the top taste are such a vital part of the season it’s well worth the effort. Now try imagining the stress level involved when tried-and-true recipes you’ve relied on turn out to be unsafe for you or a loved one. Main stay ingredients such as wheat flour, butter, cream, milk, peanuts, and more,...

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Perennial poinsettias possible!

 By Debra R. Messick Like many people, I once believed poinsettias were preordained to last only as long the Christmas season. A few hardy specimens might linger briefly into the new year, but once the holidays were gone, so too were the iconic flowers identified with them. Thanks to two patrons of Hurlock Library in northern Dorchester County, I learned that a little luck and a lot of care can keep poinsettias thriving far beyond one brief annual interlude. Just prior to Christmas 2016, a frequent library visitor was suddenly gifted an enormous poinsettia. Concerned for the safety of her feline friends at home (the plant can be toxic if ingested by cats) she donated the supersized specimen to Hurlock’s library branch, brightening the lobby through December and well into January. Staff and visitors were resigned to the eventual day it would wilt away, but that day never came. On Valentine’s Day, the plant remained hardy. As the Spring Equinox arrived, though its size had gradually diminished, its overall vigor remained intact. With Easter rapidly approaching, staff began fielding questions about what the poinsettia was still doing there. As murmurs began about the possibility of decorating the “overdue” poinsettia’s pot with bunnies and eggs, another patron mercifully stepped in with a solution. While checking out a book early last spring, Shirley Edwards was taken with the plant’s fortitude, and...

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Upcoming Events

  1. Two Artists – Two Techniques Exhibit

    November 1, 2017 - January 1, 2018
  2. FACES Holiday Exhibit & Boutique

    November 18, 2017 @ 12:00 pm - January 20, 2018 @ 4:00 pm
  3. Small Business Saturday in Historic Stevensville

    November 25 @ 11:30 am - December 20 @ 5:00 pm
  4. Talbot
 Historical
 Society
 Museums 
& 
Gardens

    December 1 @ 10:00 am - December 31 @ 4:00 pm
  5. Easton 
First 
Friday 
Gallery
 Walk

    December 1 @ 5:00 pm - December 29 @ 7:00 pm